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5

Available Courses

  • This is an open source for anyone interested in studying the original Greek of our Standard Lectionary. (No  cost; no credit)
  • This course introduces and defends the Lutheran notion of the internal clarity of Scripture. Over and against much of the preceding tradition, Lutherans have claimed that no intermediary is required to interpret Scripture: Scripture interprets itself.  This understanding is defended as the necessary condition of doing Lutheran theology faithfully. Various exegetical and hermeneutical methodologies are introduced and evaluated in light of theological pre-understandings. (2 Credits).

  • This course introduces the Old Testament, giving careful consideration to matters of interpretation and examining theologically the Torah, the Writings, and the Prophets.  Old Testament stories are seen against the backdrop of God’s law and gospel.

  •  This course gives students the opportunity to learn koine Greek through a study of select New Testament texts.   Prerequisite BT 299 or one year of college Greek.    (0 credits)
  • This course provides an introduction to the Pastoral letters, the letters of John, and Revelation, as well as issues of canonical formation in the first centuries of Christian community. Students will gain an understanding of the form and content of the works covered, as well as historical and theological importance. (3 Credits)  Prerequisite: Greek

  • This course focuses on an individual book of the Old Testament, its history, form, content, and theological motifs. This course is repeatable when covering different topics. (3 credits)
  • This course will examine basic principles of logic and argumentation, including inductive and deductive inference, formal models of logic, informal fallacies, and theories of semantics and reference, especially as they pertain to theological language and critical reflection. Prerequisite: EPR 301 (3 credits)
  • This course examines the development of the Christian Church and doctrine from Christian origins in the first century to the “harvest of medieval theology” in the work of Gabriel Biel. Special attention is given to the ecumenical councils of the church and the development and repudiation of the classical heresies. Emphasis is placed upon the relevance of church history for Christian proclamation.(2 Credits)

  • This course examines the breakdown of Enlightenment evidence traditions (e.g., Locke) under the attack of Hume and Kant, and details the development of post-Kantian theological options in the work of Fichte, Schelling, Schleiermacher, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Ritchsl, Nietzsche and Troeltsch. (3 Credits)
  • The confessional documents of the Lutheran tradition are examined in an effort to understand the historical context surrounding their writing and to develop theological possibilities for our contemporary context.  The Augsburg Confession, The Apology, The Schmalkald Articles, and the Formula of Concord are examined in detail. (3 credits)
  • This course will explore theological understandings of the church, the role of the Holy Spirit in Christian life, and the relation of church and state from a Lutheran perspective. (3 credits)
  • Title is self-descriptive. (3 Credits)

  • This course examines the components of Lutheran corporate worship. Students study the theological foundations of worship by examining selected historical and contemporary worship forms. Contemporary issues impacting worship are also investigated with the purpose of better understanding the presence of God in His Word and Sacrament.(2 Credits)

  • The student will learn basic techniques and methods for studying Biblical passages and discerning a suitable message for preaching. In particular, the student will be taught the proper place of both Law and Gospel in Biblical preaching. Various approaches to developing and delivering a sermon will be examined. The students will write and deliver sermons as a crucial part of their development of proclaiming God's word. (2 Credits)

  • Students engage issues of ministry and practice as they are more likely to occur when ministering to older adults and their families. (1.5 credits)
  • HST 351, HST 301, HST 401 & HST 302
  • This course is aimed at a basic level competency in the translation and interpretation of Biblical texts. (0 credits) Prof. Rynearson

  • This course introduces and defends the Lutheran notion of the internal clarity of Scripture. Over and against much of the preceding tradition, Lutherans have claimed that no intermediary is required to interpret Scripture: Scripture interprets itself. This understanding is defended as the necessary condition of doing Lutheran theology faithfully. Various exegetical and hermeneutical methodologies are introduced and evaluated in light of theological pre-understandings.  Prof. Sorum

  • This course examines the components of Lutheran corporate worship. Students study the theological foundations of worship by examining selected historical and contemporary worship forms. Contemporary issues impacting worship are also investigated with the purpose of better understanding the presence of God in His Word and Sacrament. Prof. Swenson

  • This course studies the life of Dr. Martin Luther within his historical context. His theological innovations are highlighted and related to our contemporary cultural understandings. Special attention is given to his Large Catechism and Small Catechism, documents that display clearly the depth of his thinking. Students are taught to think theologically in the way of the Lutheran Reformation. Major theological doctrines forged in the Reformation are carefully considered and applied to parish ministry today. Institute of Lutheran Theology 2010-11 Academic Catalog 27

  • This course introduces the Old Testament, giving careful consideration to matters of interpretation and examining theologically the Torah, the Writings, and the Prophets. Old Testament stories are seen against the backdrop of God’s law and gospel
  • The student will learn basic techniques and methods for studying Biblical passages and discerning a suitable message for preaching. In particular, the student will be taught the proper place of both Law and Gospel in Biblical preaching. Various approaches to developing and delivering a sermon will be examined. The students will write and deliver sermons as a crucial part of their development of proclaiming God's word.
  • This course introduces and defends the Lutheran notion of the internal clarity of Scripture.  Over and against the preceding tradition, Lutherans have always claimed that no intermediary is required to interpret Scripture: Scripture interprets itself.   This understanding is defended as the necessary condition of doing Lutheran theology faithfully.  Various critical methodologies are introduced and evaluated with regard to the clarity of the Biblical text.  Students will carefully examine Biblical texts in light of their internal clarity and learn how to use critical resources for interpreting them for use in preaching and leading bible study. (3 Credits) Prof. Hillmer
  • This course introduces students to basic issues of faith, knowledge, and reason, both in contemporary philosophy and theology and as these issues have been addressed historically in the Western philosophical tradition. Typical historical figures covered include Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Pascal, and Kierkegaard. Modern topics may include issues of internal and external justification and warrant, foundationalist and nonfoundationalist epistemologies, and contrasts of theological and scientific method. (3 credits) Prof. Bielfeldt
  • This course surveys important issues in the development of western theology from first century Christian origins, through the great ecumenical councils, to the "great medieval synthesis" of the thirteenth century and its critique by representatives of the via moderna.    Students learn to distinguish the development of orthodox doctrine from various heterodox errors.  Special emphasis is given to the impact of the Greek philosophical tradition on the development of Trinitarian theology and the formation of the medieval synthesis.  (3 Credits) Prof. Nestingen


  • This course is designed to introduce students to youth ministry and basic issues of theology and practice as they pertain to ministering to youth in the congregation. (1.5 credits) Prof. Smith

  • Students learn a model of preaching which takes into account the interplay of exegetical, confessional, pastoral and contextual factors.  Emphasis is placed on step-by-step practice in the preparation, writing and delivery of several sermons. (3 Credits) Prof. Wolf

  • This course studies the life of Dr. Martin Luther within his historical context.  His theological innovations are highlighted and related to our contemporary cultural understandings.  Students are taught to think theologically in the way of the Lutheran Reformation.  Major theological doctrines forged in the Reformation are carefully considered and applied to parish ministry today.  (3 Credits) Prof. Nestingen

  • This course is a study of the doctrine of God and relation of God and world.  Students will explore the theology of creation and its relation to contemporary scientific theories of cosmos and nature, and issues and theological anthropology, including possible topics of natural evil, original sin and sinfulness, and natural law and purpose.  (3 credits) Prof. Hinlicky

  • This course provides introduction both to the Wisdom literature (e.g., Psalms, Proverbs, Job) and the prophetic literature of the Old Testament.  Emphasis will be placed on the content, form, composition, and the theological motifs of these books.  (3 Credits)

  • This course is an introduction to the four canonical Gospels, addressing form, composition, coherency and principle theological motifs, as well understanding of historicity and inter-relation.   Prerequisite: Greek (3 Credits)

  • This course seeks to understand Luther’s doctrine of justification over and against the preceding Augustinian tradition, and with respect to various options within late medieval scholasticism.   Special attention is given to the project of Finnish Luther research, particularly the claim that Luther’s central salvific category is best understood as a species of theosis or deification, a notion that is prevalent within Eastern Orthodox thinking.
  • Summer lectionary series. (0 credits)


  • This summer offering provides an introduction to the Pentateuch (Torah) and historical writings of the Old Testament (Joshua through Esther). Emphasis will be placed on the content, form, composition, and the theological motifs of these books. (3 Credits)

  • This course explores from a Trinitarian perspective the traditional topics of theology: God, creation, fall, human beings, sin, Christ, justification, atonement, regeneration, Holy Spirit, sanctification, Church, sacraments, eschatology, and vocation.
  • This is a Moodle Sandbox
  • This course examines the classical theological roots of the Lutheran Reformation, its leading figures, and its key documents -- especially those collected in the Book of Concord. The objective is that students learn to think theologically in the way the Lutheran Reformation. Major theological doctrines forged in the reformation are carefully considered in light of how they apply to parish ministry today.

  • This course examines the development of the Christian Church and doctrine from Christian origins in the first century to the “harvest of medieval theology” in the work of Gabriel Biel. Special attention is given to the ecumenical councils of the church and the development and repudiation of the classical heresies. Emphasis is placed upon the relevance of church history for Christian proclamation.

  • The confessional documents of the Lutheran tradition are examined in an effort to understand the historical context surrounding their writing and to develop theological possibiliites for our contemporary context. The Augsburg Confession, The Apology, The Schmalkald Articles, the Formula of Concord are examined in detail. (3 credits)
  • This course introduces students to basic issues of faith, knowledge, and reason, both in contemporary philosophy and theology adn as these issues have been addressed historically in the Western philosophical tradition. Typical historical figures covered include Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Pascal, and Kierkegaard. Modern topics may include issues of internal and external justification and warrant, foundationalist and nonfoundationalist epistemologies, and contrasts of theological and scientific method. (3 credits)
  • A study of the doctrine of God and relation of God and world. Students will explore the theology of creation and its relation to contemporary scientific theories of cosmos and nature, and issues and theological anthropology, including possible topics of natural evil, original sin and sinfulness, and natural law and purpose. (3 credits)
  • This course is an introduction to some of the most important philosophical tools for thinking theologically. Topics may include elements of the history of philosophy, basic logic, semantic theory, modal logic, and hermeneutical theory. (3 Credits) Instructor: G. Peterson
  • This course surveys important issues in the development of western theology from the first century Christian origins, through the great ecumenical councils, to the "great medieval synthesis" of the thirteenth century and its critique by representatives of the viamoderna. Students will learn to distinguish the development of orthodox doctrine from various heterodox errors. Special emphasis is given to the impact of the Greek philosophical tradition on the development of Trinitarian theology and the formation of the medieval synthesis. (3 Credits)
  • This course studies the historical and theological aspects of Luther’s catechisms, as well as their implications for parish life. Students will be encouraged to investigate how the Large Catechism and Small Catechism developed, how they reflect evangelical theology and how they may be used in pastoral teaching, preaching, counseling, and leadership.
  • This course studies the historical and theological aspects of Luther’s catechisms, as well as their implications for parish life. Students will be encouraged to investigate how the Large Catechism and Small Catechism developed, how they reflect evangelical theology and how they may be used in pastoral teaching, preaching, counseling, and leadership.
  • This is a course into which all active students are enrolled to enable them to interact with each other and share work together.
  • The student will learn basic techniques and methods for studying Biblical passages and discerning a suitable message for preaching. In particular, the student will be taught the proper place of both Law and Gospel in Biblical preaching. Various approaches to developing and delivering a sermon will be examined. The students will write and deliver sermons as a crucial part of their development of proclaiming God's word.

  • This course studies the historical and theological aspects of Luther’s catechisms, as well as their implications for parish life. Students will be encouraged to investigate how the Large Catechism and Small Catechism developed, how they reflect evangelical theology and how they may be used in pastoral teaching, preaching, counseling, and leadership.
  • This course introduces and defends the Lutheran notion of the clarity of Scripture. Over and against the preceding tradition, Lutherans have always claimed that no intermediary is required to interpret Scripture: Scripture interprets itself. This understanding is defended as the necessary condition of doing Lutheran theology faithfully. Various critical methodologies are introduced and evaluated with regard to the clarity of the Biblical text. Students will carefully examine Biblical texts in light of their clarity and learn how to use critical resources for interpreting them for use in preaching and leading Bible study.

  • The student will learn basic techniques and methods for studying Biblical passages and discerning a suitable message for preaching. In particular, the student will be taught the proper place of both Law and Gospel in Biblical preaching. Various approaches to developing and delivering a sermon will be examined. The students will write and deliver sermons as a crucial part of their development of proclaiming God's word.

  • This course introduces and defends the Lutheran notion of the clarity of Scripture. Over and against the preceding tradition, Lutherans have always claimed that no intermediary is required to interpret Scripture: Scripture interprets itself. This understanding is defended as the necessary condition of doing Lutheran theology faithfully. Various critical methodologies are introduced and evaluated with regard to the clarity of the Biblical text. Students will carefully examine Biblical texts in light of their clarity and learn how to use critical resources for interpreting them for use in preaching and leading Bible study.

  • This course covers essentials of Greek morphology, syntax, and vocabulary. It is designed to enable students to begin to read and understand New Testament Greek for use in sermon and Bible study preparation.
  • This course investigates the relationship between the office of pastor, the content of historical faith, and concrete issues arising within a context of pastoral counseling. Emphasis is placed upon the methodological and hermeneutical priority of the law/gospel approach within a context of

    Seelensorge (care of souls). (2 Credits)
  • This course examines the development of the Christian Church and doctrine in the reformations of the sixteenth century, the Catholic counter-reformation, the rise of Protestant orthodoxies and pietism, the Enlightenment, and nineteenth and twentieth century theological development. Emphasis is placed upon the relevance of church history for Christian proclamation.  (2 Credits)

  • This course examines the classical theological roots of the Lutheran Reformation, its leading figures, and its key documents -- especially those collected in the Book of Concord. Students are encouraged to think theologically in the way of the Lutheran Reformation. Major theological doctrines forged in the Reformation are carefully considered in light of how they apply to parish ministry today. (2 Credits)

  • This course introduces the New Testament, giving careful consideration to matters of interpretation and examining theologically the Synoptic Gospels, John, Acts, the Pauline Epistles, the Pastoral Epistles, and the Book of Revelation. (2 Credits)

  • This course in apologetics ("answering theology") takes seriously God’s mandate to teach and preach "to all nations," even where Christian faith and proclamation seems problematic or impossible. Students learn the method of correlation whereby the fundamental questions of human existence are mapped to the great symbols of the Christian faith. Human cultural diversity is examined in hopes of framing concrete missional approaches for effectively proclaiming Gospel today. (2 Credits)

  • This course surveys important issues in the development of western theology from first century Christian origins, through the great ecumenical councils, to the "great medieval synthesis" of the thirteenth century and its critique by representatives of the via moderna. Students learn to distinguish the development of orthodox doctrine from various heterodox errors. Special emphasis is given to the impact of the Greek philosophical tradition on the development of Trinitarian theology and the formation of the medieval synthesis. (3 Credits)

  • This course is an examination of the central claims of Christianity from a philosophical perspective. Topics include the cosmological, teleological and ontological arguments for the existence of God, the nature and compatibility of the divine properties, the nature of religious experience, the problem of evil, evidence for miracles, and the possibility of survival of death. Prerequisite: EPR 301 (3 Credits)

  • This course provides an introduction to philosophical and theological ethics, with attention to the relation of ethical reflection and Lutheran theological commitments. (3 credits)

  • Students refine and augment their preaching skills, with special attention devoted to different kinds of texts and occasions, sermon planning, articulating Law and Gospel, and preaching that addresses the life of the church. (3 Credits)

  • This course provides an introduction to the Pentateuch (Torah) and historical writings of the Old Testament (I Samuel through II Chronicles). Emphasis will be placed on the content, form, composition, and the theological motifs of these books. (3 Credits)

  • An examination of the theology of the person and nature of Christ, including doctrines of incarnation and atonement, with special attention to Lutheran theological understandings of Christ’s significance. (3 credits)

  • This is a repeatable course typically offered during January term. Each course will examine different issues at the interface of theology and science, including basic issues of relation, historical interaction, creation and evolution, neuroscience and spirit, and issues of science-based technologies and theological ethics. (3 credits)

  • This course provides an introduction to the Pauline epistles, providing understanding of their form and content, as well as historical and theological importance. Prerequisite: Greek (3 Credits)

  • A Graduate-level course in the discourse of Absolution and the Sacraments.

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